Archive for the ‘Architecture’ Category

Day111 Universal Unitarian Church

Universal Unitarian Church

Universal Unitarian Church

Originally All Souls Church (est 1881), the Universalist church was dedicated in June, 1892.

It is a combination of Norman and English Gothic architecture designed by A.C.  Willard.  The walls are of brick faced with red sandstone from a quarry in Flagstaff, Arizona.  In the vestibule of the 50ft tower, the floor is of marble from a quarry in Colton. All windows are original.

The focal point of this room is a large triple window on the north wall.
The center section honors Dr. George Henry Deere, who with his wife Louisa, arrived in Riverside July 1881 to found this Universalist congregation-The first in Southern California.

In 1891 the Deeres went East to raise money for the building of the chruch.  In Chicago, they visited the Sebiling Wells Glass Co.  From several designs presented to them, they chose various parts to create this human figure of Jesus in a window free of religious symbols.

Universalists viewed Jesus as the Master Teacher rather than as the divine Son of God.  (courtesy Universalist Unitarian Church)

Day110 Ames-Westbrook House

Ames-Westbrook House

Ames-Westbrook House

Samuel A. Ames was the first owner of this Queen Anne Style House. Born in Boston in 1832, Mr. Ames worked as a pony express rider in the southwest before coming to Riverside in 1873 and prospering in citriculture.

Dr. Edward H. Wood purchased the home in 1909. In 1920, He subdivided the adjacent land into the Homewood Court and Elmwood Court tracts and began the well-known “Wood Streets” naming sequence.

Day109 Arlington Library

Arlington Library

Arlington Library

Today’s photo comes from a request.

Listed in the National Register of Historic Places since July 22, 1993

Day108 Riverside Medical Clinic

Riverside Medical Clinic

Riverside Medical Clinic

For those of you following this blog, you know that this place has become my new “home away from home”.

Not because I am injury prone, or for health issues, but because of their hosting the Riverside 365 Gallery.

Yesterday, with lighting up and canvas finally hung (though more to come), I finally had the chance to stand back and take a look.

It was nice to watch people stopping to look, discuss the images, and try to figure out where each image was taken.

In the short time that I was there, a few people (7 or 8) stopped in to visit and chat with me.

What a great experience.

Any part of Riverside that you would like to see in the gallery?

This image was taken as I was walking out, at closing time.   I love this building!

Day107 AMC at Galleria

AMC Theater, Galleria at Tyler

AMC Theater, Galleria at Tyler

Entertainment in Riverside is finally making a comeback!

With the re-opening of the Riverside Plaza, restoration of the Fox Theater, University Village, and others, there is no loss for entertainment in the area.

Though my friends and I still refer to it (and probably always will) as the “Tyler Mall”, The Gallery at Tyler is of the latest contenders looking to fill your entertainment “needs” with the addition of the AMC.

16 screens, 3-D capabilities, stadium seating, and surrounded by restaurants such as the Yardhouse and Elephant Bar (not to mention shopping), you could easily spend your evening in this one shopping center.

Day104 Riverside Aquatic Center

Riverside Aquatic Center

Riverside Aquatic Center

RCC will soon be home to a state of the art Aquatic Complex.

It will feature a 65-meter pool, which can be sectioned off to run several activities at the same time; 10-, 7-, 5-, 3- and 1-meter diving boards; and seating for 800. It will be built near the college’s two existing pools, which will continue to be used for training and recreation.

The center will host competitions and serve as a training facility for aquatic teams, whose members will no longer have to drive to Orange County to use a similar facility.

I have been told that one of the center’s biggest boasts will be the construction of a “fast” pool.

So what is a “fast” pool?
Now personally, I don’t know what makes a pool fast, nor did many of the people of whom I have questioned concerning the matter.

If you find yourself losing sleep over this matter, feel free to let me know, and I am sure that I can make up some believable information to sooth your restless nights!

It will feature a 65-meter pool, which can be sectioned off to run several activities at the same time; 10-, 7-, 5-, 3- and 1-meter diving boards; and seating for 800. It will be built near the college’s two existing pools, which will continue to be used for training and recreation.

Day103 Riverside Metrolink

Riverside Metrolink Station

Riverside Metrolink Station

Part of being a “BIG” city is having public transportation.

With more and more of the city being made up of people from the outlying areas, and jobs moving farther and farther away, a speedy alternative to the 91 freeway commute is a must.

In comes MetroLink.

The station, located within Riverside’s yet to be developed “shopping district” is often packed with cars from commuters seeking a break from the normally congested highways.

Day99 Riverside Art Museum

Riverside Art Museum

Riverside Art Museum

The historic structure which houses the Riverside Art Museum (RAM) was built by the renowned architect Julia Morgan as Riverside’s original YWCA.

The Riverside YWCA was organized in 1906, but it was not until 1929, after years of developing membership, financial security, and considering three different sites that a location for Riverside’s first YWCA building was chosen. Selecting the corner of 7th (now Mission Inn Avenue) and Lime Streets, the directors of YWCA hired Morgan to draw formal plans for their new building. Pressure mounted from local business leaders, including Mission Inn owner Frank Miller. Miller’s preference was to hire an architect who would design in a similar style to that of the Mission Inn and Riverside’s Municipal Auditorium, both buildings in close proximity to the new YWCA site. However, the YWCA Directors held firm in their determination to have a place for women designed by a woman, and Morgan was ultimately hired. A ground-breaking ceremony was held on January 27, 1929. The building, based on Mediterranean and Classical architectural design elements, mingles beautifully, even now, with the Mission Revival and Spanish Revival styles of the Mission Inn and Municipal Auditorium.

The Riverside Art Museum

In the early 1950s, a loosely knit group of artists formed the Riverside Art Association to encourage the study and appreciation of the arts. Their first home, the Riverside Art Center, was a recently abandoned Municipal Dog Pound which City of Riverside officials leased to the Art Association for $1 a year.

By 1960, the growing Association clearly needed more space for its studio classes and numerous exhibitions. When Morgan’s YWCA building became available for sale, the Riverside Art Center purchased the building for $250,000. A successful fund drive followed and on July 5, 1967, YWCA officials formally turned over Morgan’s building to the Riverside Art Center. The transition from a YWCA building to the existing art museum was soon underway.

In 1982, Morgan’s building was placed on the National Register of Historic Places and was designated a Historic Landmark by the City of Riverside.

The Riverside YWCA was organized in 1906, but it was not until 1929, after years of developing membership, financial security, and considering three different sites that a location for Riverside’s first YWCA building was chosen. Selecting the corner of 7th (now Mission Inn Avenue) and Lime Streets, the directors of YWCA hired Morgan to draw formal plans for their new building. Pressure mounted from local business leaders, including Mission Inn owner Frank Miller. Miller’s preference was to hire an architect who would design in a similar style to that of the Mission Inn and Riverside’s Municipal Auditorium, both buildings in close proximity to the new YWCA site. However, the YWCA Directors held firm in their determination to have a place for women designed by a woman, and Morgan was ultimately hired. A ground-breaking ceremony was held on January 27, 1929. The building, based on Mediterranean and Classical architectural design elements, mingles beautifully, even now, with the Mission Revival and Spanish Revival styles of the Mission Inn and Municipal Auditorium.

Day94 Life Arts Building

Life Arts Building

Life Arts Building

Here is a “new & improved” view of the Life Arts Building, taken with the new wide angle lens.

The day before Arts Walk, and the studios are already busy preparing for the next day’s events.

Though I was originally supposed to show at this event, my daughter’s International Baccalaureate Ceremony is the same day as the event.  Who can miss their own child’s graduation ceremonies?

Day93 My Porch

Glow

Glow

Okay, so maybe this isn’t really by front porch, but I do spend a lot of time here.

Today though, it wasn’t for business.
I just received a new wide angle lens, primarily to capture this shot.

Though this one is only a “test” picture, I am quite happy with how it came out!

The “real” image that I have is taken later in the evening when all the lights are on……..and taken with a tripod so that I can get better detail and color.

None the less, this is YOUR image for the day!

Mission Inn Rotunda
Riverside, CA