Archive for the ‘Riverside365’ Category

Day122 Arts Walk

Riverside ArtsWalk

Riverside ArtsWalk

The first Thursday of each month brings the community of Riverside (and neighboring areas) out to celebrate Arts Walk.

Officially from 6pm-9pm, visitors can browse through more than 20 galleries, studios, and museums; entertain themselves with street performers; and share in the cultural and artistic diversification of the Inland Empire.

I have met some really great people and artists out here.

If you haven’t been, come out, look around, and enjoy the community spirit!

Day120 Back to the Grind

Back to the Grind

Back to the Grind

Founded in 1996, Back to the Grind brought to Riverside the first community coffee shop that was an alternative to the old coffee gathering places of the past. Set in a Victorian cafe, the ambiance is conducive to conversation, meetings, entertainment and alternative lifestyles.

Still the gathering place for students, business people and anyone who just wants a really good experience with beverages. The Grind has grown to be the premiere place to associate and fraternize with your friends or yet to be friends. You are invited to experience the best in beverage enjoyment in the Inland Empire, in an atmosphere designed to make you comfortable regardless of your lifestyle.

The Grind plays host to a wide number of bands of every genre. From local vocalists, to touring bands seeking a lively venue, Back to the Grind provides a great location for artists seeking to get exposure.

There are scheduled meetings ranging from chess and yoga, to Ukelele lessons and support groups. You can also see special performances from burlesque dancing to themed parties.

3575 University Ave.
Riverside,
, CA , 92501
(951) 784-0800
Founded in 1996, Back to the Grind brought to Riverside the first community coffee shop that was an alternative to the old coffee gathering places of the past. Set in a Victorian cafe, the ambiance is conducive to conversation, meetings, entertainment and alternative lifestyles.

Still the gathering place for students, business people and anyone who just wants a really good experience with beverages. The Grind has grown to be the premiere place to associate and fraternize with your friends or yet to be friends. You are invited to experience the best in beverage enjoyment in the Inland Empire, in an atmosphere designed to make you comfortable regardless of your lifestyle.

Day111 Universal Unitarian Church

Universal Unitarian Church

Universal Unitarian Church

Originally All Souls Church (est 1881), the Universalist church was dedicated in June, 1892.

It is a combination of Norman and English Gothic architecture designed by A.C.  Willard.  The walls are of brick faced with red sandstone from a quarry in Flagstaff, Arizona.  In the vestibule of the 50ft tower, the floor is of marble from a quarry in Colton. All windows are original.

The focal point of this room is a large triple window on the north wall.
The center section honors Dr. George Henry Deere, who with his wife Louisa, arrived in Riverside July 1881 to found this Universalist congregation-The first in Southern California.

In 1891 the Deeres went East to raise money for the building of the chruch.  In Chicago, they visited the Sebiling Wells Glass Co.  From several designs presented to them, they chose various parts to create this human figure of Jesus in a window free of religious symbols.

Universalists viewed Jesus as the Master Teacher rather than as the divine Son of God.  (courtesy Universalist Unitarian Church)

Day110 Gage Canal

Gage Canal

Gage Canal

Without Matthew Gage, there would be no Gage Canal.

Without the Gage Canal, Riverside’s citrus industry would not have flourished, and the city would not have prospered the way it did around the turn of the 20th century.

And without that prosperity, people would probably not still be arguing about the water coursing down the 130-year-old canal.

That the canal exists at all is notable. Gage, a jeweler who emigrated from Canada, had no background in water or engineering. And he had no money. Under a federal program at the time, he filed for claim on 640 acres of land, promising he could deliver water to irrigate the tract within three years.

Gage was sure he could bring water to the area along the base of the hills to the southeast of downtown. Although it seems counterintuitive, the water would come from the Santa Ana River in San Bernardino and flow downhill through what is now Grand Terrace and the Highgrove area into Riverside.

Through a series of clever cuts and minor tunnels in the hillsides between Loma Linda and Grand Terrace, the gravity-fed canal continued through the western edge of the current UC Riverside campus to its end between Harrison and McAllister streets, 20.13 miles from its origin.

It wasn’t long before citrus groves blanketed its route. Many of those groves are now gone. But the water is still flowing in the canal, feeding the remaining acres of citrus as well as commercial nurseries and the gardens of homes along its course. The land is part of Riverside’s greenbelt.

The canal is also a magnet for recreation. Joggers and cyclists regularly use the dirt paths along its edge. Old-timers tell stories of floating down the waterway during hot summer days long ago.

And while the open part of the canal between Arlington Avenue and its terminus is usually full of water, that water does not come from the original wells at the Santa Ana River. Those wells are still active, but their water is tapped for use by the Riverside Public Utilities.
(Courtesy The Press Enterprise Tuesday, July 29, 2008)

Day110 Ames-Westbrook House

Ames-Westbrook House

Ames-Westbrook House

Samuel A. Ames was the first owner of this Queen Anne Style House. Born in Boston in 1832, Mr. Ames worked as a pony express rider in the southwest before coming to Riverside in 1873 and prospering in citriculture.

Dr. Edward H. Wood purchased the home in 1909. In 1920, He subdivided the adjacent land into the Homewood Court and Elmwood Court tracts and began the well-known “Wood Streets” naming sequence.

Day109 Arlington Library

Arlington Library

Arlington Library

Today’s photo comes from a request.

Listed in the National Register of Historic Places since July 22, 1993

Day108 Riverside Medical Clinic

Riverside Medical Clinic

Riverside Medical Clinic

For those of you following this blog, you know that this place has become my new “home away from home”.

Not because I am injury prone, or for health issues, but because of their hosting the Riverside 365 Gallery.

Yesterday, with lighting up and canvas finally hung (though more to come), I finally had the chance to stand back and take a look.

It was nice to watch people stopping to look, discuss the images, and try to figure out where each image was taken.

In the short time that I was there, a few people (7 or 8) stopped in to visit and chat with me.

What a great experience.

Any part of Riverside that you would like to see in the gallery?

This image was taken as I was walking out, at closing time.   I love this building!

Riverside 365 Gallery Now Open (Closed for Festival of Trees)

Riverside 365 Gallery

Riverside 365 Gallery

Located at:

Riverside Medical Clinic
7117 Brockton Ave.
Riverside, CA 92506

Move to TrashClosed at this time for the annual Festival of Trees exhibit

Day107 AMC at Galleria

AMC Theater, Galleria at Tyler

AMC Theater, Galleria at Tyler

Entertainment in Riverside is finally making a comeback!

With the re-opening of the Riverside Plaza, restoration of the Fox Theater, University Village, and others, there is no loss for entertainment in the area.

Though my friends and I still refer to it (and probably always will) as the “Tyler Mall”, The Gallery at Tyler is of the latest contenders looking to fill your entertainment “needs” with the addition of the AMC.

16 screens, 3-D capabilities, stadium seating, and surrounded by restaurants such as the Yardhouse and Elephant Bar (not to mention shopping), you could easily spend your evening in this one shopping center.

Day106 Riverside’s Beginnings

Parent Navel Orange Tree

Parent Navel Orange Tree

The Navel Orange is solely responsible for the existence of Riverside and its prosperous younger years.

Now at 137 years old, the parent navel orange, which started it all, is still healthy and bearing fruit.

The tree’s history can be traced from Bahia state, Brazil. The first introduction of the navel orange bud-wood to the United States probably occurred during the end of the 19th century. It was taken from Bahia to Washington, D.C., by boat in 1871. It was then transported by rail, stage coach, and finally by wagon to the home of Luther and Eliza Tibbets in the newly formed settlement of Riverside.

The tree became popular in California because its fruits were large, sweet and seedless — distinguishing them from the small and seedy fruit on the seedling trees then present in California. The Navel Orange Tree became influential in the development of numerous new cities, fruit packing houses, boxing machines, fruit wraps and the iced railroad car.

The magnificent tree is considered to be the most important plant introduction ever made into the United States, and all Washington navel orange trees throughout the world are possibly descended from it.