Posts Tagged ‘Architecture’

Day135 Metropolitan Museum

Riverside Museum

Riverside Museum

By 1900, Riverside had become one of the premiere winter resort communities in the nation. Engulfed in twenty thousand acres of Washington Navel orange groves, Riverside served as a center for agricultural innovation, bringing the revolution of corporate capitalism to the southwestern U.S. via the modern citrus enterprise.

Located in the broad, inland valley of the Santa Ana River in Southern California, Riverside numbered among the wealthiest communities per capita in the nation. The University of California Citrus Experiment Station (core of the present University of California, Riverside) brought a tradition of ground-breaking scientific research to the city. Riverside’s renowned Mission Inn hotel, and its inspirational role in the development of the Arts & Craft Style, attracted some of America’s foremost entrepreneurs in search of new recreational, aesthetic and business opportunities. Riverside became a magnet for prosperous, educated practitioners of the Arts and Crafts Movement in the West. in the nation.

Out of this context came the Cornelius Earle Rumsey Indian Collection which later became the Riverside Municipal Museum now known as the Riverside Metropolitan Museum (RMM). The Museum opened in the basement of City Hall on December 12, 1924, when the widow of National Biscuit Company (NABISCO) magnate Cornelius Earle Rumsey donated his collection of Native American artifacts to the City of Riverside. An ordinance, amending the City Charter and establishing a Municipal Museum, was adopted by the City Council on August 27, 1925. The current mission statement found in the city ordinance states that, “All collections and exhibits of the Museum shall generally reflect but shall not necessarily be limited to the specific interpretations of the history, natural history and anthropology of the City and County of Riverside and the immediate environs of southern California.” From 1924 on, the collections have grown, typically through donations by prominent citizens and organizations, contributing to RMM holdings in the disciplines of local history, natural history, and anthropology. From 1925-48, the RMM was located in the basement of the old City Hall building on Riverside’s Seventh Street (now Mission Inn Avenue).

In 1987, the main museum building and Heritage House were placed on the National Register of Historic Places. In 2005, the Riverside Municipal Museum changed its name to Riverside Metropolitan Museum.

New Home of the Riverside Municipal Museum, 1948

In 1948, the Museum was moved to the basement of the former U. S. Post Office, adjacent to the old City Hall, a Renaissance Revival-style structure, built in 1912-14. The main exhibits, administration offices, anthropology, natural history curatorial offices, collections storage, and registrar’s office carried on their activities in this building. The history curatorial office/collections and exhibits services eventually moved to an annex, a converted Safeway Supermarket, located four blocks from the main building.

Day129 Sails

Sails

Sails

Day123 Tamale Factory

Tamale Factory

Tamale Factory

Though I must admit that I have never eaten at the Tamale Factory, the architecture there is fantastic!

Owned and operated by Josie Hornback & Naomi Avila (a mother and daughter team), the place is a favorite among the local business people.

Designed and built by Avila’s husband, the building is meant to appear ageless and blend with surrounding businesses.

The Tamale Factory also features the spacious and elegant Avila Terrace. Set atop the Tamale Factory with open air terrace and formal dining room, Avila Terrace hosts private events plus an award winning Mystery Dinner Theater program on Friday and Saturday Nights!

The Tamale Factory is located in the pedestrian walk (Main St), across from the Mission Inn.

Day120 Back to the Grind

Back to the Grind

Back to the Grind

Founded in 1996, Back to the Grind brought to Riverside the first community coffee shop that was an alternative to the old coffee gathering places of the past. Set in a Victorian cafe, the ambiance is conducive to conversation, meetings, entertainment and alternative lifestyles.

Still the gathering place for students, business people and anyone who just wants a really good experience with beverages. The Grind has grown to be the premiere place to associate and fraternize with your friends or yet to be friends. You are invited to experience the best in beverage enjoyment in the Inland Empire, in an atmosphere designed to make you comfortable regardless of your lifestyle.

The Grind plays host to a wide number of bands of every genre. From local vocalists, to touring bands seeking a lively venue, Back to the Grind provides a great location for artists seeking to get exposure.

There are scheduled meetings ranging from chess and yoga, to Ukelele lessons and support groups. You can also see special performances from burlesque dancing to themed parties.

3575 University Ave.
Riverside,
, CA , 92501
(951) 784-0800
Founded in 1996, Back to the Grind brought to Riverside the first community coffee shop that was an alternative to the old coffee gathering places of the past. Set in a Victorian cafe, the ambiance is conducive to conversation, meetings, entertainment and alternative lifestyles.

Still the gathering place for students, business people and anyone who just wants a really good experience with beverages. The Grind has grown to be the premiere place to associate and fraternize with your friends or yet to be friends. You are invited to experience the best in beverage enjoyment in the Inland Empire, in an atmosphere designed to make you comfortable regardless of your lifestyle.

Day118 “Der” Wienerschnitzel

wienerschnitzel

wienerschnitzel

How could I forget this old “Der” Wienerschnitzel building?

Though I am not much of the hot dog person, my sister used to love this place growing up.

For some strange reason, this iconic style building seems to be a thing of the past

Day117 Heritage House

Heritage House

Heritage House

Heritage House

8193 Magnolia Ave
Riverside, CA

Day116 Weber House (Circa. 1932-1938)

Riverside Historical Society

Riverside Historical Society

Peter J. Weber was chief designer for the architectural firm of G. Stanley Wilson. Ma. Weber applied his talents to the International rotunda at the Mission Inn, Redlands Post Office, and many other Wilson projects.

After a visit to North Africa, Weber began building his own house. Influenced by his travels, the Weber house is a unique blend of Moorish, Craftsman, Art Nouveau, and Art Deco styles.

Notable not only for its unique design, the Weber house features extraordinary handcrafted design details. Extensive interior woodwork is hand-carved and/or decoratively painted. Most ceilings are of pine planks, some carved and painted. All hinges are of wrought-iron and all doors and cabinets have decorative nail heads.

Ma. Weber installed a still operating solar water heater in 1935 with collector panels made of automobile windshields. All of the exterior brick was used and the broken tile which makes up the incredible bathroom mosaic was also recycled. Exterior woodwork was oiled and stained with used crankcase oil. Basement areas help to keep the house cool in the summer.

An early tower which would have unified the bedroom and bathroom with the living room, kitchen, and garage was designed but never built.

The nine acres of orange groves which originally surrounded the Weber house are now home to two modern hotels. Owners of the (then) Days Inn Hotel began a restoration of the house which is now being completed by the Old Riverside Foundation.

The Weber house is listed in the National Register of Historic Places and is recognized locally as City Landmark #52.

(Courtesy Old Riverside Foundation)

Day112 Heritage

Riverside Heritage

Riverside Heritage

Riverside’s Heritage runs deep!

Back in the late 1800’s to early 1900’s, Riverside’s population had the highest income per capita in the United States.

Citrus “plantation” homes, similar to this sprung up all around the region.

Today, many of these homes still exist, often times oddly found amongst the ocean of tract homes that surround them.

Day111 Universal Unitarian Church

Universal Unitarian Church

Universal Unitarian Church

Originally All Souls Church (est 1881), the Universalist church was dedicated in June, 1892.

It is a combination of Norman and English Gothic architecture designed by A.C.  Willard.  The walls are of brick faced with red sandstone from a quarry in Flagstaff, Arizona.  In the vestibule of the 50ft tower, the floor is of marble from a quarry in Colton. All windows are original.

The focal point of this room is a large triple window on the north wall.
The center section honors Dr. George Henry Deere, who with his wife Louisa, arrived in Riverside July 1881 to found this Universalist congregation-The first in Southern California.

In 1891 the Deeres went East to raise money for the building of the chruch.  In Chicago, they visited the Sebiling Wells Glass Co.  From several designs presented to them, they chose various parts to create this human figure of Jesus in a window free of religious symbols.

Universalists viewed Jesus as the Master Teacher rather than as the divine Son of God.  (courtesy Universalist Unitarian Church)

Day110 Ames-Westbrook House

Ames-Westbrook House

Ames-Westbrook House

Samuel A. Ames was the first owner of this Queen Anne Style House. Born in Boston in 1832, Mr. Ames worked as a pony express rider in the southwest before coming to Riverside in 1873 and prospering in citriculture.

Dr. Edward H. Wood purchased the home in 1909. In 1920, He subdivided the adjacent land into the Homewood Court and Elmwood Court tracts and began the well-known “Wood Streets” naming sequence.