Posts Tagged ‘Unique to Riverside’

Day120 Back to the Grind

Back to the Grind

Back to the Grind

Founded in 1996, Back to the Grind brought to Riverside the first community coffee shop that was an alternative to the old coffee gathering places of the past. Set in a Victorian cafe, the ambiance is conducive to conversation, meetings, entertainment and alternative lifestyles.

Still the gathering place for students, business people and anyone who just wants a really good experience with beverages. The Grind has grown to be the premiere place to associate and fraternize with your friends or yet to be friends. You are invited to experience the best in beverage enjoyment in the Inland Empire, in an atmosphere designed to make you comfortable regardless of your lifestyle.

The Grind plays host to a wide number of bands of every genre. From local vocalists, to touring bands seeking a lively venue, Back to the Grind provides a great location for artists seeking to get exposure.

There are scheduled meetings ranging from chess and yoga, to Ukelele lessons and support groups. You can also see special performances from burlesque dancing to themed parties.

3575 University Ave.
Riverside,
, CA , 92501
(951) 784-0800
Founded in 1996, Back to the Grind brought to Riverside the first community coffee shop that was an alternative to the old coffee gathering places of the past. Set in a Victorian cafe, the ambiance is conducive to conversation, meetings, entertainment and alternative lifestyles.

Still the gathering place for students, business people and anyone who just wants a really good experience with beverages. The Grind has grown to be the premiere place to associate and fraternize with your friends or yet to be friends. You are invited to experience the best in beverage enjoyment in the Inland Empire, in an atmosphere designed to make you comfortable regardless of your lifestyle.

Day117 Heritage House

Heritage House

Heritage House

Heritage House

8193 Magnolia Ave
Riverside, CA

Day116 Weber House (Circa. 1932-1938)

Riverside Historical Society

Riverside Historical Society

Peter J. Weber was chief designer for the architectural firm of G. Stanley Wilson. Ma. Weber applied his talents to the International rotunda at the Mission Inn, Redlands Post Office, and many other Wilson projects.

After a visit to North Africa, Weber began building his own house. Influenced by his travels, the Weber house is a unique blend of Moorish, Craftsman, Art Nouveau, and Art Deco styles.

Notable not only for its unique design, the Weber house features extraordinary handcrafted design details. Extensive interior woodwork is hand-carved and/or decoratively painted. Most ceilings are of pine planks, some carved and painted. All hinges are of wrought-iron and all doors and cabinets have decorative nail heads.

Ma. Weber installed a still operating solar water heater in 1935 with collector panels made of automobile windshields. All of the exterior brick was used and the broken tile which makes up the incredible bathroom mosaic was also recycled. Exterior woodwork was oiled and stained with used crankcase oil. Basement areas help to keep the house cool in the summer.

An early tower which would have unified the bedroom and bathroom with the living room, kitchen, and garage was designed but never built.

The nine acres of orange groves which originally surrounded the Weber house are now home to two modern hotels. Owners of the (then) Days Inn Hotel began a restoration of the house which is now being completed by the Old Riverside Foundation.

The Weber house is listed in the National Register of Historic Places and is recognized locally as City Landmark #52.

(Courtesy Old Riverside Foundation)

Day114 Riverside Rancheros

Riverside Rancheros Barrel Racer

Riverside Rancheros

The year was 1959 when an idea was born. The city of Riverside should have an equestrian club to enhance horse related social activities. A parcel of land was purchased for a non-profit horse
club and the Riverside Rancheros was formed. The club was incorporated in 1960 and was established through family memberships.
The past and current members are proud of this facility, a facility completely maintained by the members through continuous hard work and participation. In 1961 a 300 foot arena was
constructed and a clubhouse was built. The facility was now equipped with an arena, clubhouse and horse corrals giving its members and guests a place to ride and enjoy their horses.

For nearly five decades, the Riverside Rancheros has been the headquarters for youth riding groups, mounted police and sheriffs’ training center, rodeos, horse shows, team roping, barrel racing and team sorting. It has allowed youth groups such as FFA, 4H, Cub Scouts, Y-Indian Guides and Junior Rodeo to use the club facilities for benefit dinners, fundraisers and therapeutic riding programs.

The Rancheros has its own Jr. Equestrian drill team performing in shows and parades throughout California. (Courtesy Riverside Rancheros)

Day111 Universal Unitarian Church

Universal Unitarian Church

Universal Unitarian Church

Originally All Souls Church (est 1881), the Universalist church was dedicated in June, 1892.

It is a combination of Norman and English Gothic architecture designed by A.C.  Willard.  The walls are of brick faced with red sandstone from a quarry in Flagstaff, Arizona.  In the vestibule of the 50ft tower, the floor is of marble from a quarry in Colton. All windows are original.

The focal point of this room is a large triple window on the north wall.
The center section honors Dr. George Henry Deere, who with his wife Louisa, arrived in Riverside July 1881 to found this Universalist congregation-The first in Southern California.

In 1891 the Deeres went East to raise money for the building of the chruch.  In Chicago, they visited the Sebiling Wells Glass Co.  From several designs presented to them, they chose various parts to create this human figure of Jesus in a window free of religious symbols.

Universalists viewed Jesus as the Master Teacher rather than as the divine Son of God.  (courtesy Universalist Unitarian Church)

Day110 Gage Canal

Gage Canal

Gage Canal

Without Matthew Gage, there would be no Gage Canal.

Without the Gage Canal, Riverside’s citrus industry would not have flourished, and the city would not have prospered the way it did around the turn of the 20th century.

And without that prosperity, people would probably not still be arguing about the water coursing down the 130-year-old canal.

That the canal exists at all is notable. Gage, a jeweler who emigrated from Canada, had no background in water or engineering. And he had no money. Under a federal program at the time, he filed for claim on 640 acres of land, promising he could deliver water to irrigate the tract within three years.

Gage was sure he could bring water to the area along the base of the hills to the southeast of downtown. Although it seems counterintuitive, the water would come from the Santa Ana River in San Bernardino and flow downhill through what is now Grand Terrace and the Highgrove area into Riverside.

Through a series of clever cuts and minor tunnels in the hillsides between Loma Linda and Grand Terrace, the gravity-fed canal continued through the western edge of the current UC Riverside campus to its end between Harrison and McAllister streets, 20.13 miles from its origin.

It wasn’t long before citrus groves blanketed its route. Many of those groves are now gone. But the water is still flowing in the canal, feeding the remaining acres of citrus as well as commercial nurseries and the gardens of homes along its course. The land is part of Riverside’s greenbelt.

The canal is also a magnet for recreation. Joggers and cyclists regularly use the dirt paths along its edge. Old-timers tell stories of floating down the waterway during hot summer days long ago.

And while the open part of the canal between Arlington Avenue and its terminus is usually full of water, that water does not come from the original wells at the Santa Ana River. Those wells are still active, but their water is tapped for use by the Riverside Public Utilities.
(Courtesy The Press Enterprise Tuesday, July 29, 2008)

Day110 Ames-Westbrook House

Ames-Westbrook House

Ames-Westbrook House

Samuel A. Ames was the first owner of this Queen Anne Style House. Born in Boston in 1832, Mr. Ames worked as a pony express rider in the southwest before coming to Riverside in 1873 and prospering in citriculture.

Dr. Edward H. Wood purchased the home in 1909. In 1920, He subdivided the adjacent land into the Homewood Court and Elmwood Court tracts and began the well-known “Wood Streets” naming sequence.

Day106 Riverside’s Beginnings

Parent Navel Orange Tree

Parent Navel Orange Tree

The Navel Orange is solely responsible for the existence of Riverside and its prosperous younger years.

Now at 137 years old, the parent navel orange, which started it all, is still healthy and bearing fruit.

The tree’s history can be traced from Bahia state, Brazil. The first introduction of the navel orange bud-wood to the United States probably occurred during the end of the 19th century. It was taken from Bahia to Washington, D.C., by boat in 1871. It was then transported by rail, stage coach, and finally by wagon to the home of Luther and Eliza Tibbets in the newly formed settlement of Riverside.

The tree became popular in California because its fruits were large, sweet and seedless — distinguishing them from the small and seedy fruit on the seedling trees then present in California. The Navel Orange Tree became influential in the development of numerous new cities, fruit packing houses, boxing machines, fruit wraps and the iced railroad car.

The magnificent tree is considered to be the most important plant introduction ever made into the United States, and all Washington navel orange trees throughout the world are possibly descended from it.

Day102 Casey’s CupCakes

Casey's Cupcakes

Casey’s Cupcakes

Did someone say sweet tooth?

Casey’s Cupcakes & Cappuccino is definitely a “must stop” place if you have a passion for sweets.

Their array of cakey treats range from decadent chocolate to peanut butter, toasted coconut to raspberry.

This place is done to the “9’s”!
Everything from the quality baked goods to the matching boxes and bags that you will haul them out in is first rate.

If you are ever in the downtown pedestrian mall, stop by, pay a visit, and treat yourself to a…….uhm………treat!

Day100 The Tank at Fairmount Park

Fairmount Park Tank

Fairmount Park Tank

So why is there a tank at Fairmount Park anyway?

The tank is a memorial to the workers and soldiers that built and operated the amphibious tank LVT-(A)-1 in WWII.

For those unaware, these tanks were actually built right here in Riverside….